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Who Has Access to Your Accounts?

Who Has Access to Your Accounts?

My husband and I have been moving this past month, and now that we're semi-settled into the new homestead, I've had to update our address and contact info on all our personal accounts.

My husband and I have been moving this past month, and now that we're semi-settled into the new homestead, I've had to update our address and contact info on all our personal accounts. And it got me to thinking: how often are administrators updating who has access to make changes on their school social media, website and other public-facing accounts?

As part of your back-to-school process, you need to incorporate this bit of important housekeeping to ensure access is secure and up-to-date. So what sort of things should you check? Consider the following:

  • Review the list of who has editing/admin rights to any account that publishes public information. That includes any social media accounts (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, etc.), your school or district's website, your mass notification system (AKA robocall) and any other tool you use to communicate with parents and your community.
  • Remove any users who are no longer with your district. If the person is still within the district but at a different school, he/she no longer needs access to your school's Facebook page, for example, so that person needs to be removed as well.
  • Make sure at least two people are administrators on ALL accounts. If only one person has access to the accounts and something happens to that person, it's a pretty big hassle (if it's even possible) to access the sole account to publish content and give rights to alternate staff members.
  • If you are the sole admin on the accounts, be thoughtful and intentional about choosing others who need access. These people need to be savvy with the tools you want them to administer, and they need to be responsible and know what is/is not acceptable content.
  • If you no longer have someone who is knowledgeable enough to administer a specific account (like Instagram) and the account has been inactive, consider closing it. However, if you send out a community survey (which we recommend at least at the beginning of the school year) and Instagram is the top pick for how they want to receive information, then you need to find a staffer or contact us for training so that you can effectively reach your community using their preferred method.

If you aren't sure how to review who has access to your accounts, how to edit/delete rights or you would like additional training yourself, please let us know. Regular communication with your stakeholders is key, but you want to make sure only authorized individuals have access on your accounts to do so.

Sarah Julian

Director, Communications

Sarah serves as the Director of Communications for the OPSRC. In this role, she provides support, consultation and training on a variety of critical tools and PR functions, including communication plans, social media policies, crisis communications, media relations and website content.

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