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Without Data, Then How?

Without Data, Then How?

How does a teacher know which students are struggling readers, struggling in math or any other subject unless there has been some form of assessment?

How does a teacher know which students are struggling readers, struggling in math or any other subject unless there has been some form of assessment?  I don’t why I am dismayed, but I am, as this past week it was revealed–in conversations with teachers in three different regions of the state–they have yet to see test results from last spring’s state mandated tests.  

It is hard enough most times for teachers to teach when they are faced with challenges like limited resources and students coming to school hungry. But by not allowing teachers to view these test results, administration has added to these challenges. It is invaluable for teachers to have access to these test results for discussion in vertical, horizontal and Professional Learning Communities (PLC) meetings.  This data empowers teachers to teach to the areas of misconceptions and to the areas where their students are struggling, so again I ask: without data how?

When teachers have knowledge from test results regarding which students sit on the “bubble,” they can then provide intervention strategies that could help these students become proficient in some knowledge areas.Without data, how can students progress?

Those test scores are neither U.S. secrets, nor should they be buried in a box in an office. As we enter spring testing frenzy, pull out testing data (usually found in a notebook somewhere), and use it to help you make wise instructional decisions. It is hoped that everyone–administrators, counselors, curriculum directors but mostimportantly, the teachers—have had a chance to examine and adjust their curriculum based upon this data.

Use data to better inform your teachers and teach your students.

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